July 22nd, 2012
First words: magnificent dialogue. This book is full of it and it is wonderfull and chilling all once and I got a really strong picture of the characters and their subtleties.
Second words: subtly macabre. There is a spooky undertone to the whole book.
'A Pale View of the Hills' follows a Japanese woman called Etsuko as she reflects on the suicide of her eldest daughter and remembers moments from when she lived in post war Nagasaki, Japan. Many of her memories centre around a strange woman called Sachiko and her daughter. Sachiko was creepy!!!
There is sadness, there is regret and there are moments of joy but all up, this story is about the small things in life; the daily rituals, the conversations, the meals eaten. Kazuo Ishiguro manages to give significance to these small, ordinary things through his storytelling and I love him for it.
If you liked this perhaps you might like:'An Equal Stillness' by Francesca Kay'Of Mice and Men' by John Steinbeck'Disgrace' by J.M.Coetzee 

First words: magnificent dialogue. This book is full of it and it is wonderfull and chilling all once and I got a really strong picture of the characters and their subtleties.

Second words: subtly macabre. There is a spooky undertone to the whole book.

'A Pale View of the Hills' follows a Japanese woman called Etsuko as she reflects on the suicide of her eldest daughter and remembers moments from when she lived in post war Nagasaki, Japan. Many of her memories centre around a strange woman called Sachiko and her daughter. Sachiko was creepy!!!

There is sadness, there is regret and there are moments of joy but all up, this story is about the small things in life; the daily rituals, the conversations, the meals eaten. Kazuo Ishiguro manages to give significance to these small, ordinary things through his storytelling and I love him for it.

If you liked this perhaps you might like:
'An Equal Stillness' by Francesca Kay
'Of Mice and Men' by John Steinbeck
'Disgrace' by J.M.Coetzee