April 13th, 2012
Someone told me that ‘The Hunger Games’ by Suzanne Collins was the ‘new Twilight’… so it was with trepidation that I watched the movie and, against all preconceptions, I really enjoyed it. Apart from the whole love triangle thing, I found the whole concept riveting. The Hunger Games is like a modern day version of the gladiators or a comment on the sick fascination we have with reality  television; where death is sport and human pain and desperation to survive is food for the masses.
So, of course, having enjoyed the movie, I read the first book in the series. I discovered that the movie was even better than I thought… it almost exactly matched the book. Word for word, page by page. Whoever did the casting for ‘The Hunger Games’ got it spot on. At first, because of the similarity to the movie I found the book a bit boring but as soon as the games started and the fight for survival began I was hooked. I found the survival techniques of Katniss the most interesting (hunting, healing and finding water etc).
I also liked the idea of a futuristic world that Collin’s presents us with, full of colours and tastes and a fair share of cultural commentary. In the recent movie ‘In Time’, districts are graded in terms of wealth and time is the currency, the statement is posed ‘for a few to be immortal, many must die’. So it is with the country of Panem; for the Capitol to feast glutinously, many districts must starve. So it is with the world we live in.
There have been many similarities drawn up between this book and other books and movies but it shows that there is something special about ‘The Hunger Games’ that it is so popular and the other versions aren’t. I do want to watcht the Japanese movie ‘Battle Royale’ though. Apparently this movie is awesome.
So, if you liked this book:continue with the seriesand watch Battle Royale 

Someone told me that ‘The Hunger Games’ by Suzanne Collins was the ‘new Twilight’… so it was with trepidation that I watched the movie and, against all preconceptions, I really enjoyed it. Apart from the whole love triangle thing, I found the whole concept riveting. The Hunger Games is like a modern day version of the gladiators or a comment on the sick fascination we have with reality  television; where death is sport and human pain and desperation to survive is food for the masses.

So, of course, having enjoyed the movie, I read the first book in the series. I discovered that the movie was even better than I thought… it almost exactly matched the book. Word for word, page by page. Whoever did the casting for ‘The Hunger Games’ got it spot on. At first, because of the similarity to the movie I found the book a bit boring but as soon as the games started and the fight for survival began I was hooked. I found the survival techniques of Katniss the most interesting (hunting, healing and finding water etc).

I also liked the idea of a futuristic world that Collin’s presents us with, full of colours and tastes and a fair share of cultural commentary. In the recent movie ‘In Time’, districts are graded in terms of wealth and time is the currency, the statement is posed ‘for a few to be immortal, many must die’. So it is with the country of Panem; for the Capitol to feast glutinously, many districts must starve. So it is with the world we live in.

There have been many similarities drawn up between this book and other books and movies but it shows that there is something special about ‘The Hunger Games’ that it is so popular and the other versions aren’t. I do want to watcht the Japanese movie ‘Battle Royale’ though. Apparently this movie is awesome.

So, if you liked this book:
continue with the series
and watch Battle Royale
 

January 5th, 2012
It is not often that this can be said… but in the case of Julie and Julia, I think that the movie is better than the book. (‘Chocolat’ is another book which, I don’t believe lives up to the movie… think Johnny Depp)
Julie Powell, started a project to make all of the Recipes in Julia Child’s ‘Mastering the Art of French Cooking’ in one year. This book is a memoir of that eventfull year, recording mishaps and triumphs in the kitchen as well as her love life, her work life and the lives of her closest friends.
Julie recorded her year on a blog and through this became famous. Her writing style is perfect blog material: explosive at times, emotional and fast paced.. but as a novel I quickly tired of her tone. Perhaps it would be best to read a page a day or something like that? Or perhaps read her blog instead. But if you only like reading blogs, this might be the perfect stepping stone into reading longer texts.
Also, her descriptions of Julia Child and her relationship with her husband Paul didn’t ring as true to life as Meryl Streep’s performance in the film. Streep was FANTASTIC as Julia Child… she really pulled off the voice and the energy. This energy doesn’t seem to come through as much while reading the book.
Here are some books in diary/letter form which you might also like:'Bridget Jones Diary' by Helen Fielding (unlike J&J I loved these books!!) 'The Princess Diaries' by Meg Cabot (for a younger audience but always entertaining)'The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society' by Mary Ann Schaffer'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley (a bit of gothic horror for you)'Dracula' by Bram Stoker (because I love it so much!) 

It is not often that this can be said… but in the case of Julie and Julia, I think that the movie is better than the book. (‘Chocolat’ is another book which, I don’t believe lives up to the movie… think Johnny Depp)

Julie Powell, started a project to make all of the Recipes in Julia Child’s ‘Mastering the Art of French Cooking’ in one year. This book is a memoir of that eventfull year, recording mishaps and triumphs in the kitchen as well as her love life, her work life and the lives of her closest friends.

Julie recorded her year on a blog and through this became famous. Her writing style is perfect blog material: explosive at times, emotional and fast paced.. but as a novel I quickly tired of her tone. Perhaps it would be best to read a page a day or something like that? Or perhaps read her blog instead. But if you only like reading blogs, this might be the perfect stepping stone into reading longer texts.

Also, her descriptions of Julia Child and her relationship with her husband Paul didn’t ring as true to life as Meryl Streep’s performance in the film. Streep was FANTASTIC as Julia Child… she really pulled off the voice and the energy. This energy doesn’t seem to come through as much while reading the book.

Here are some books in diary/letter form which you might also like:
'Bridget Jones Diary' by Helen Fielding (unlike J&J I loved these books!!) 
'The Princess Diaries' by Meg Cabot (for a younger audience but always entertaining)
'The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society' by Mary Ann Schaffer
'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley (a bit of gothic horror for you)
'Dracula' by Bram Stoker (because I love it so much!) 

June 13th, 2011
I love the circus. Whether it is the ‘Webber Bros’ or ‘Cirque du Soleil’, I cannot help myself… I have to “step right up”.
So, when ‘Water for Elephants’ came out in cinemas, I watched it immediately.
I wish that I had let Robert Pattinson wait a little longer. The movie so closely matched the book, that reading it felt like reading the screenplay and any element of surprise was lost. 
Flicking from the present day, to 1930’s America (think depression and prohibition), the story follows Jacob Jankowski as he runs away to join the circus. In the present day he is 93 and lives in a rest home. A young circus arrives in town and memories of his life as a young menagerie vet return vividly.
'Water for Elephants' is an easy and enjoyable read, perfect for reading tucked up in bed, late at night. It has all the elements of a page turner: romance, scandal, action, friendship and a performing elephant.
If you like this book you may also like:'The Memory Keeper's Daughter' by Kim Edwards'The Girl With a Pearl Earring' by Tracy Chevalier'Ship of Brides' by Jojo Moyesand.. this is a bit of a long shot but my mum also LOVED THIS BOOK:'Let me Sing you Gentle Songs' by Linda Olsson 

I love the circus. Whether it is the ‘Webber Bros’ or ‘Cirque du Soleil’, I cannot help myself… I have to “step right up”.

So, when ‘Water for Elephants’ came out in cinemas, I watched it immediately.

I wish that I had let Robert Pattinson wait a little longer. The movie so closely matched the book, that reading it felt like reading the screenplay and any element of surprise was lost. 

Flicking from the present day, to 1930’s America (think depression and prohibition), the story follows Jacob Jankowski as he runs away to join the circus. In the present day he is 93 and lives in a rest home. A young circus arrives in town and memories of his life as a young menagerie vet return vividly.

'Water for Elephants' is an easy and enjoyable read, perfect for reading tucked up in bed, late at night. It has all the elements of a page turner: romance, scandal, action, friendship and a performing elephant.

If you like this book you may also like:
'The Memory Keeper's Daughter' by Kim Edwards
'The Girl With a Pearl Earring' by Tracy Chevalier
'Ship of Brides' by Jojo Moyes
and.. this is a bit of a long shot but my mum also LOVED THIS BOOK:
'Let me Sing you Gentle Songs' by Linda Olsson