July 17th, 2012

I just finished re-reading my favorite book - ‘Cloud Atlas’ by David Mitchell. Favourite book is a pretty big call I know so I thought that to celebrate, I would collate a list of some of my favorite books of all time.

I like them all for different reasons and they are all brilliant reads. Each one is highly recommended by me!

'Cloud Atlas'- David Mitchel (a work of art and masterfull storytelling. Six unique plot lines bisect each other chronologically. Sounds complicated but it is BREATHTAKING.)

'Dracula' by Bram Stoker (have reviewed this book - suspense to the extreme!)

Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince by J.K.Rowling (this and book 3 are my favs of the series.)

'The Remains of the Day' by Kazuo Ishiguro (Maybe my fav author…subtle, heartfelt and moving. This was one of those books that I put down and couldn't get out of my mind.) 

'You Are Special' by Max Lucado (a picture book for kids that tells the story of my heart and makes me cry almost every time I read it.)

'The Rocky Shore' by Jenny Bournholdt (best book of poetry in the world)

'The Power of One' by Bryce Courtney (great characters, great story - this one got me into boxing. It is uplifting and heart breaking all at once. Don't bother with Tandia, the sequel.)

'The Girl with a Pearl Earring' by Tracy Chevalier (art, love, history - this book ticks a lot of interesting boxes for me. Love almost anything Chevalier writes.)

'The Blind Assassin' by Margaret Atwood (think 1930s, think trashy comics and fur coats, think button factories and picnics. This is a story which keeps you guessing right up to the end.)

'The Raging Quiet' by Sherryl Jordan (a teen novel written by Kiwi author. Set in medieval times, but not a fantasy. This is a story of unusual friendships and is an absolute page turner.)

AAAAAAh there are soo many more to add… Perhaps I will do another post about my next top ten

October 6th, 2011
Mum bought this book for me when I was feeling particularly discouraged. It was good medicine to take. It encouraged me to keep pursuing my dreams.
Laurence Fearnley, a distinctly ‘kiwi’ writer, tells the story of a poet/ butcher named Boden Black, as he navigates childhood and becoming a fully fledged writer. Fearnley stettles in on events in Boden’s life that shaped him. This book is set in the South Island of New Zealand, particularly around Mt Cook and the surrounding land, Christchurch, Fairlie, small town New Zealand.
This book is thoughtful and carefully written, suitably reflecting the quiet journey of a quiet man. Every word seemed to speak of love for our country and our landscape and the richness from which New Zealanders have to draw creative inspiration. My only qualm would be the slightly petulant ‘voice’ of Boden, early on in the book, when he is working on the building the hut on Mt Cook. His tendancy to overthink situations got on my nerves…. personality clash with a fictional character :).
I read fiction and poetry by New Zealand authors as much as I can and try to buy new coppies whenever I can, to support the industry. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if artists could make their living off what they love most and what they are naturally inclined to do? 
If you want to read some more NZ fiction, here are some starters:'Let Me Sing You Gentle Songs'  by Linda Olsson (NB this book is slow and gentle- as the title would suggest)'The Raging Quiet' by Sheryl Jordan 'Mr Pip' Lloyd Jones'The Halfmen of O' by Maurice Gee (this is for pre teens, first book of a trilogy)'Opportunity' by Charlotte Grimshaw'The Scarecrow' by Ronald Hugh Morrison (thriller/ gothic novels) 
And, as always, the favoured short stories of Katherine Mansfield.
For some reason I have never enjoyed Owen Marshall’s short stories… maybe they were overdone a bit in English class at school. 

Mum bought this book for me when I was feeling particularly discouraged. It was good medicine to take. It encouraged me to keep pursuing my dreams.

Laurence Fearnley, a distinctly ‘kiwi’ writer, tells the story of a poet/ butcher named Boden Black, as he navigates childhood and becoming a fully fledged writer. Fearnley stettles in on events in Boden’s life that shaped him. This book is set in the South Island of New Zealand, particularly around Mt Cook and the surrounding land, Christchurch, Fairlie, small town New Zealand.

This book is thoughtful and carefully written, suitably reflecting the quiet journey of a quiet man. Every word seemed to speak of love for our country and our landscape and the richness from which New Zealanders have to draw creative inspiration. My only qualm would be the slightly petulant ‘voice’ of Boden, early on in the book, when he is working on the building the hut on Mt Cook. His tendancy to overthink situations got on my nerves…. personality clash with a fictional character :).

I read fiction and poetry by New Zealand authors as much as I can and try to buy new coppies whenever I can, to support the industry. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if artists could make their living off what they love most and what they are naturally inclined to do? 

If you want to read some more NZ fiction, here are some starters:
'Let Me Sing You Gentle Songs'  by Linda Olsson (NB this book is slow and gentle- as the title would suggest)
'The Raging Quiet' by Sheryl Jordan 
'Mr Pip' Lloyd Jones
'The Halfmen of O' by Maurice Gee (this is for pre teens, first book of a trilogy)
'Opportunity' by Charlotte Grimshaw
'The Scarecrow' by Ronald Hugh Morrison (thriller/ gothic novels) 

And, as always, the favoured short stories of Katherine Mansfield.

For some reason I have never enjoyed Owen Marshall’s short stories… maybe they were overdone a bit in English class at school.